Local water rescue team urges boaters and swimmers to stay alert

Tri-state water rescue teams are on the alert as the boating and swimming season is in full swing. More than 50% of accidents happen on Cincinnati’s waterfront. An elite team called the Marine Rescue Team is tasked with responding to these calls. “It’s really heartbreaking to see someone in an emergency, but we have to put that aside when we’re called upon to do our job,” said Jon Thompson, a marine rescue team member and firefighter from Cincinnati. “The problem we have at the moment is that we would prefer to have a dock here downtown, where we have to drive almost 10 to 12 minutes to get to our dock where the boat is. Make time an issue for lifesaving accuracy. “So naturally every second counts and when someone you know, for example, wrecks their boat and it’s in the water, 10 or 20 minutes can feel like a lifetime,” he said. A lifetime for an event he says is preventable, urging boaters and swimmers to stay safe and alert this summer. “Really, there should always be someone on the boat who is sober, just like in a car, you need a designated driver, and everyone should be wearing life jackets. That’s very important. ” Special gadgets on their life jackets help locate swimmers and perform faster rescues. “It’s just a light emitter when you go in the water, just in case we have a man overboard it will emit as soon as the water hits that. Sometimes we have a handy line so if we have to go in the water after someone, they’ll attach themselves to each other so we’re always connected to the boat,” said Matthew Thompson, Cincinnati firefighter and rescue team member. maritime. It is also important to stay calm. Ensure a safer and faster rescue. “If they’re freaking out, their kicks in the water, it’s a lot harder to communicate with them because they’re obviously not listening,” he said. Those who often end up needing rescue on the river come from boating accidents. A special radar helps them see barges, people and other boats. “We can’t see the barges, they’re not very well lit. A lot of people think so because they’re so big, but we’ve had several accidents where people have hit them because they can’t see them. not,” Jon Thompson says. But they leave with one message, wear your life jacket no matter your age or level of experience in the water. “The main thing with a life jacket, you can’t really put it on wrong, just make sure it fits snugly that way it doesn’t ride up on your face or come off on your head.”

Tri-state water rescue teams are on the alert as the boating and swimming season is in full swing.

More than 50% of accidents happen on Cincinnati’s waterfront. An elite team called the Marine Rescue Team is tasked with responding to these calls.

“It’s really heartbreaking to see someone in an emergency, but we have to put that aside when we’re called upon to do our job,” said Jon Thompson, a marine rescue team member and firefighter from Cincinnati. “The problem we have at the moment is that we would prefer to have a dock here downtown, where we have to drive almost 10 to 12 minutes to get to our dock where the boat is.

Make time an issue for accurate rescue.

“So naturally every second counts and when someone you know, for example, wrecks their boat and it’s in the water, 10 or 20 minutes can feel like a lifetime,” he said.

A lifetime for an event he says is preventable, urging boaters and swimmers to stay safe and alert this summer.

Really, there should always be someone on the boat who is sober, just like in a car, you need a designated driver, and everyone should be wearing life jackets. Its very important.”

Special gadgets on their life jackets help locate swimmers and perform faster rescues.

“It’s just a light emitter when you go in the water, just in case we have a man overboard it will emit as soon as the water hits that. Sometimes we have a handy line so if we have to go in the water after someone, they’ll attach themselves to each other so we’re always connected to the boat,” said Matthew Thompson, Cincinnati firefighter and rescue team member. maritime.

It is also important to stay calm. Ensure a safer and faster rescue.

“If they’re freaking out, their kicks in the water, it’s a lot harder to communicate with them because they’re obviously not listening,” he said.

Those who often end up needing rescue on the river come from boating accidents. A special radar helps them see barges, people and other boats.

“We can’t see the barges, they’re not very well lit. A lot of people think so because they’re so big, but we’ve had several accidents where people have hit them because they can’t see them. not,” Jon Thompson said.

But they leave with one message, wear your life jacket, no matter your age or level of experience in the water.

“The main thing with a life jacket, you can’t really put it on wrong, just make sure it fits snugly that way it doesn’t ride up on your face or come off on your head.”